Industry Live – How to write a job-winning resume

Registrations are open!

Join our next Industry Live, secure your spot today.

When: Wednesday May 26

Time: 11.30am to 12.00pm AEDT (plus an optional 15 min Q&A at the end).

Topic: Skills Series – How to write a Job-Winning Resume

Our panellist, Anne (pictured) is a Talent Acquisition Manager at Findex. Come along and find out what she does in her job, as she shares her practical tips with students on job applications and resumes, what to include in your resume but just as importantly what not to include. Also hear step by step tips on how to write a cover letter from the experts.

Register below to receive your Zoom link to the event on May 26.

We will send out a recording of the session to everyone who registered but couldn’t make the live session.

Please note, students will only be able to ask questions and chat to the panellists in real time. To get the most out of Industry Live, we hope you can join us live.

Register via the button below or copy paste the URL in to your browser: https://info.beaconfoundation.org.au/e/892741/l-892741-2021-05-11-pr8j/prfb/141879411?h=xp8ve_UckvavR-kQo92xsEywnIwFK896M5p4EqzhFCQ

 

 

Beacon welcomes federal budget investment in apprentices, but more needs to be done to help prepare kids for the workforce

MEDIA RELEASE

Wednesday, 12 May

Beacon welcomes federal budget investment in apprentices, but more needs to be done to help prepare kids for the workforce

Beacon is leading the way in Tasmania to help young Tasmanians become the next generation of apprentices and trainees in the State.

Beacon’s Chief Operating Officer, Kath McCann, welcomed the federal budget initiatives to make available more apprenticeships in Tasmania.

“It’s vital that the federal government continues to invest in apprenticeships and traineeships and last night’s budget is certainly a big step in the right direction,” Ms McCann said.

“For young Tasmanians to succeed though, we need to prepare them so they have the best possible chance of succeeding in the workforce.  That work needs to start in schools with young people gaining exposure to business and industry to inspire them.  Research shows that the more engagement students have with industry, the more likely they are to get a job once they finish school.

“Beacon is a leader in working with schools, communities, local businesses and industry to lift the aspirations of young Tasmanians and make sure they’re ready and committed to joining the workforce in an area they’re passionate about.  But we also need to make sure that industry is armed with the right knowledge and skills to take on young people too.

“Beacon is laying the groundwork for success and we need to ensure the work that we’re doing and other organisations like ours is recognised as invaluable to filling apprenticeships and traineeships.  Our role is to work collaboratively with the community, including businesses, to prepare kids for the challenges ahead and invest in them so they are ready to take on the opportunity of an apprenticeship or traineeship.

“Beacon is committed to working with the state and federal governments to help young people seize opportunities like getting an apprenticeship or traineeship and we look forward to seeing the investments announced last night rolled out in the community.”

 

 

Action Crew 7172 Awarded ABC Community Spirit Award

This week Action Crew 7172 were awarded the ABC Community Sprit Above and Beyond School Community Project Award. Collective ed. alongside the Sorell School and the Sorell Community have worked alongside the students of Action Crew 7172 to create engaging multimedia content that captures and presents the voices of the students and their community around issues that matter to them. The students have demonstrated exceptional growth in skills and confidence and have put forward their ideas and concepts in a way that have created broad interest.

We are so proud of the work of Action Crew 7172 and congratulate all involved, particularly the students themselves for all of their hard work and commitment.

The image profiled here is of the some of the Action Crew students during their radio interview with ABC Hobart during the awards process. For more information on the ABC Community Spirit Awards, go to – https://ab.co/communityspiritawards

 

Youth of Sorell team up to solve global challenges on a local scale

From tackling plastic pollution to saying no to racism, no issue is too big for Action Crew 7172.

Action Crew 7172 is a Collective ed. initiative in Sorell which sees students of Sorell School explore how producing short films can be used as a tool to communicate their ideas and encourage students to participate in education and the broader community. Across six sites in Tasmania, Collective ed is exploring how a place based approach to education can positively impact year 12 attainment and meaningful pathways for young people.

Action Crew 7172 is a student led initiative, guided by and with the support of teachers and the Collective ed. team with skillsets in video making, community development and youth leadership. The school now has a Pop Up Studio with outstanding equipment including multiple video cameras, mics and green screens. The students take the lead- performing every role in the crew- camera, sound, script, direction interviewing and editing. They also develop transferable skills such as empathy, new ways of communicating, leadership and teamwork. The development of these skills is considered crucial by Collective ed. for young people to pursue meaningful post-school pathways in the 21st century, one of the initiative’s main goals.

Action Crew 7172 work of the principle “Nothing about us, without us.”

The students describe it as an opportunity to explore their curiosity. It is a way for them to find out things they did not know we were interested in. As one of the students puts it, “to explore things is the essence of curiosity.

Creating a platform where curiosity can flourish is important to Collective ed. as it helps students stay engaged in school and identify post-school pathways that they are interested in.

Action Crew is one piece of a bigger puzzle that is being laid by Collective ed. It functions as a foundational corner piece for the long-term goals of Collective ed. where a new system can be built that supports all young people to complete year 12 and continue on a meaningful post-school pathway.

This year, Action Crew is designing social change projects to tackle real world challenges. We had a chat with the students from the crew to learn more about each project.

Tackling plastic pollution by encouraging the local community to sew their own boomerang bags

Change makers:

Tahlia
Lloyd
Lacey
Lilly

Boomerang bags is an existing world wide project where people from communities come in and sew tote bags to reduce the use of plastic bags and create conversations about the issue of plastic and pollution. The team explains;

“It is called boomerang bags because it keeps giving back to the community.”

There are more than 1100 boomerang bag communities in the world. With plastic pollution being a global issue and affecting Sorell and the community, Sorell students Tahlia, Lloyd, Lacey and Lilly think it is time for Sorell to get sewing. They believe even small things can make a big difference saying;

“if we can get the Sorell community involved and actively thinking about their plastic consumption, hopefully, there can be a few less beautiful animals suffocating because of the human race”.

This year, the team is calling on their peers to join the project. They will make a promotional film to share information about the boomerang bags project and why we urgently need to act on plastic pollution.

Importantly, they are also looking outside of the school and calling on the whole of the community to get involved. To celebrate Sorell’s upcoming bicentenary this year 2021, they want to make at least 200 bags as a gift to the community. They are inviting anyone interested in fighting plastic pollution and celebrating Sorell to join one or more of their boomerang bag sewing bees. If you want to learn more about ways to get involved, reach out to boomerang bags: boomerangbags.sorell@gmail.com

Bringing a world wide public art project to Sorell 

Change makers:

Isaac
Doug
Amelia
Deakin
Travis

In a Tasmania first, the students behind Sorell INSIDE OUT will photograph 200 portraits of young people in the community and exhibit these as part of a global initiative known as the INSIDE OUT Project.

The production team, made up by Isaac, Doug, Amelia and Deakin along with other interested students, will capture images of “awesome young people in Sorell” and print and display these portraits around the town as part of Sorell’s bi-centennial celebration. The team says too often, young people are not invited to decision making;

“Young people have brilliant ideas to make this world a better place”

“Action Crew is led by the principle that there will be nothing about us, without us. This is one piece in that puzzle and we are part of laying it out”

The production team is looking forward to working with the community to create and display the portraits to acknowledge the importance of young people. Sorell INSIDE OUT will be exhibited in public places throughout the Sorell township as part of the bi-centennial celebration. Their contribution will also be the first entry to date by the Tasmanian state to the global project putting Sorell on the map and be documented as part of the international platform insideoutproject.net/en.

Sorell School: it is time to fly the flag!

Change makers
Emma
Riley
Pascall
Kane

The project “Let’s fly the rainbow flag @ Sorell School” is an initiative to share a simple message of love is love. The team behind the initiative, Emma, Riley and Pascall wants to create an environment at school where everyone can be themselves and no one feels the need to hide their sexuality. Part of this, they say, is the simple action of seeing the rainbow flag raised on the school grounds.

They say;

“We believe in more kindness and no judgement. Everyone should be able to be their true selves, at all times”.

The team reached out to the Victorian organisation Raising Rainbows which aims to aim to raise awareness, educate communities and ultimately, reduce the instances of LGBTIQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/gender diverse, intersex and queer) related bullying in regional schools and communities. With their support, they are launching a campaign at the school to introduce the rainbow flag. This includes building a business case for the cause as well as identifying the cost of adding another flag pole to the school and the flag itself.

The goal is to gain enough support from peers and the school as well as secure the finances needed to introduce the rainbow flag at Sorell School by the end of this year.

Sorell School says NO to Racism

Change makers
Leetesha
Maggie
Emma
Ryan

Tired of hearing racist insults, Leetesha, Maggie and Emma decided they wanted to do something to stop it.

“We knew we had to do something. People use racism slurs way too much and it is hurtful”, the team said.

Together, they came up with the idea to launch a bumper sticker campaign to raise awareness and stop racism at Sorell School.

People will be encouraged to use the stickers on their cars, laptops, windows or in other publicly visible places to show their support to stop racism. Through this, the team hopes to see the stickers become a common sight at the school and throughout Sorell.

“Racism is an issue that is affecting all communities. We hope our stickers will raise awareness beyond Sorell as people travel in cars to Hobart or other places in the state. Everyone should do their part to stop racism.”


To learn more about Collective ed. Sorell and their initiatives, keep an eye out on Beacon Foundation’s social media or subscribe to our newsletter. 

About Collective ed.
Collective ed. is a five year initiative launched in 2017 by Beacon Foundation exploring how a place based approach to education can positively impact year 12 attainment and meaningful pathways for young people. Collective ed. consists of six sites and communities; Jordan River, Bayview, Sorell, Ulverstone (also known as Collective ed. Central Coast) and Deloraine/Meander Valley (recently rebranded to ‘Thrive’ by the community). Collective ed. is funded by Paul Ramsay Foundation and the Tasmanian Government. For more information, click here.

 

 

 

 

Beacon Foundation joins digital inclusion alliance to call for the closure of Tasmania’s digital divide

Lead by TasCOSS, the peak body for Tasmania’s community services industry, Beacon Foundation along with TasICT, The Smith Family, Carers Tasmania, COTA Tasmania, NILS Tasmania and Neighbourhood Houses Tasmania have joined forces and formed the Tasmanian digital inclusion alliance to urge all political leaders to commit to policies and actions that improve digital access, affordability and ability to ensure no Tasmanian is left offline.

TasCOSS CEO Adrienne Picone said Tasmania was the most digitally disadvantaged state in the country, with more than 65,000 Tasmanians unable to participate online.

“The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the digital divide in our state that without urgent action is at risk of becoming even wider,” Ms Picone said.

“Access to digital services is essential for daily life, in the same way as electricity and water, and as the first state to see the full rollout of the nbn network, we should be making the most of the opportunities that digital technology brings.

“From remote schooling, to working from home or researching and applying for jobs, having access to devices and the internet has never been more vital.”

The Tasmanian digital inclusion alliance have prepared  Joint Statement on Digital Inclusion seeking commitments from all candidates and parties to a range of initiatives including improving Tasmania’s Australian Digital Inclusion Index score to at least the national average by 2025, introducing a telecommunications concession, and the provision of devices and dongles/data to all State Government school students from upper primary through to Year 12.

Beacon Foundation look forward to working with the alliance to ensure an active closure of the digital divide.

For more information, please refer to the 2021 State Election Joint Statement on Digital Inclusion.

Action Crew 7172 students featured in state wide campaign to raise funds for Beacon Foundation

Beacon Foundation are excited to announce we are one of three chosen charities in Aurora’s new Double The Plus Campaign. This means that every customer who signs up to use the aurora+ app up until May 23, 2021, gets to choose a charity that Aurora donates $30 to. Along with Beacon Foundation, the other charities include Speak Up Stay ChatTY and Cancer Council Tasmania.

The campaign will run across social media, TV and billboards. We had a great time filming our promotional video with Sorell School, the principal Jenny Cowling and Action Crew 7172.

Action Crew 7172 is a Collective ed. project which sees students explore how producing films can be used as a tool to communicate their ideas and encourage students to participate in education and the broader community. Action Crew 7172 work of the principle “Nothing about us without us.”

Students in Sorell Schools Pop Up Studio take the lead- performing every role in the crew- camera, sound, script, direction interviewing and editing, whilst building the essential skills of empathy, creativity, leadership and teamwork.

This year, Action Crew will turn their newly discovered potential into reality, from video making to change making.  Action Crew is designing social change projects; such as tackling plastic pollution by encouraging the local community to sew their own boomerang bags, taking part in a global people’s art project, saying no to racism and flying the rainbow flag at Sorell School.

 

Lilly is the Sorell School student starring in the video along with the rest of Action Crew; Mack, Jessica, Hayden and Dean.

 

Watch the video:

 

To learn more about the aurora+ campaign. Visit their website.

 

 

 

From a Beacon student to a MyRoad mentor

Recently, Beacon received two photos of an old Beacon brooch and a Student Ambassador Award from Selena Wang. Selena Wang is today a consultant at Ernst & Young and had just signed up for the first time as a MyRoad mentor volunteer through her work.

Already in High School, Selena was part of an initiative called the Beacon Ambassador program which helped young people build leadership skills. She also participated in our work-readiness workshops, High Impact Programs (HIP).  She shared the impact the programs had had on her and said they had been valuable for my personal development”. Intrigued, we asked if Selena would take the time to meet (virtually!) to tell her story and what it was like to now find herself on the other side, as a mentor in MyRoad 

Hi Selena, you’re now a MyRoad mentor, how come you decided to volunteer with Beacon Foundation?   

I wanted to volunteer with the Beacon Foundation because I wanted to give back. I had myself participated in Beacon programs when I was a student at my old high school. I’m lucky too because I can volunteer during work hours as part of our employee engagement program.   

We heard you volunteer a fair bit. What else do you do?  

I am a mentor on an all-girls robotics team in which we build a 50kg robot every summer that participates in the FIRST Robotics Competition. I also volunteer with the FIRST Lego League each year as a judge or referee. Additionally, I volunteer with Youth Without Borders, a youth-led non-for-profit organisation. In the past, I have mainly supported the Spark Engineering Camp initiative in a managing capacity. I am currently serving as a board member in the organisation 

Beacon Foundation focus on supporting youth transition from education to employment, why is this important for you to support?  

When you transition from education to employment, there is a change from one environment to another and a shift in mindset is often required. In high school, the teachers will remind us about handing in homework. At universitythe reminders are less frequent and by the time you enter the workforce the responsibility to deliver is left to you. We are now essentially in charge of our own careerGiving students the opportunity to participate in programs like MyRoad and to learn from professionals to gain new perspectives is one piece of the puzzle to help students prepare for their future. 

After being a mentor at MyRoad, was there anything the students said that made an impact on you? 

There was one section of the program where we talked about resilience. I was quite impressed by the students who shared stories about their personal experiences of displaying resilience and how they have tackled challenges they may have faced. It gave me confidence they will be able to continue to show resilience in their chosen studies and careers 

What would you say to others who are considering volunteering but may not have made up their mind just yet?  

Do it! I would highly recommend volunteering, it’s a worthwhile and rewarding experienceYou are sharing valuable knowledge with students who are very interested in what you have to say and would appreciate the insights from a conversation with a working professional.  

About MyRoad

The MyRoad mentor program is run online and gives students an opportunity to talk directly with an industry mentor. Close to 1000 trained mentors (all volunteers) from diverse industries and backgrounds are matched with students from schools across Australia where they meet in a supervised online environment. Mentors guide students through a set of 6 structured modules, all aligned to the Australian Curriculum for General Capabilities and Work Studies. In response to COVID-19 lockdowns, students can now also participate in MyRoad from home once a school has made a booking.

For more information about MyRoad and how to sign up your students, click here. To register as a MyRoad volunteer mentor, please fill in this form.

Careers in sport can be many types of jobs. Learn more in Industry Live

Join Beacon’s next Industry Live on Tuesday, March 23, 11.30am to 12.30 pm AEDT.

Who are the people behind the players? There are many different careers in sport that you can have. In our next Industry Live, we’ll chat to some key people that work in sports clubs about how you can land a job like theirs to help players keep playing.

Jo Healy

The session will be hosted by Jo Healy. Jo is a Fox Sports News reporter/presenter and will be leading the conversation with panellists, discussing different jobs and opportunities in the sporting industry.

One of our panellists is David Buttifant, Co-founder and director of Resilience Builders. David has a proven track record at the highest level of elite
sport for over 25 years. He has worked with athletes at Olympic level and in the Australian Football League (AFL). His leadership and resilience facilitation experience is equally impressive. He’s delivered hundreds of presentations and programs to audiences ranging from large corporations to school and sporting communities.

He shares his evidence-based techniques and strategies to make healthy habits stick. His approach to building resilience and leadership involves planning, creating habits, self-reflection and accountability. David firmly believes that these qualities are the pathway to building a better version of oneself. They have supported him over a lifetime.

David Buttifant

David Buttifant

Through his own experiences, he has guided others to adapt, to change and to achieve success in sport, business and life. David has a Doctorate in Exercise Physiology from Victoria University and an MBA.

Joining David is Sarah Jenner. Sarah is an Advanced Sports Dietitian, and for the last four years has worked in Australian football with the Carlton Football Club.

Sarah also spends her time teaching Sports Nutrition to university students at La Trobe University. Sarah has always had a love for food and cooking and, grew up playing all kinds of sport – which she believes built her passion and love for what she does now.

 

Sarah’s favourite thing about working in sport is that no two days are the same, and particularly enjoys teaching footy players how to cook.

Sarah Jenner

Our final panellist is Lillian. Lillian is the Wellbeing and Engagement Manager at Carlton Football Club. She is a registered nurse and started off volunteering with the club over 8 years ago, as her family is actively involved.  Lillian has always enjoyed playing sport, being an avid netball player and loves volunteering, which has now evolved into a full-time role with the club.

 

Her skills as a nurse, helping and supporting the players when there are injuries on and off the field, has now been identified and supported by AFL, which has resulted in a role for a registered nurse to work with all clubs across the code. So, you never know where your volunteering might lead you!

Register for our March 23 event and receive your zoom link via this link.

Lillian

We will send out a recording of the session to everyone who registered but couldn’t make the live session. Please note, students will only be able to ask questions and chat to the panellists in real time. To get the most out of Industry Live, we hope you can join us live.

 

 

 


About Industry Live: 

Join Beacon Foundation online for Industry Live, a series of live career awareness and exploration events via video conference. We invite expert industry panellists to share their stories, top tips for success, and answer questions from school students across Australia in a discussion led by a facilitator. Industry Live is open to all students across Australia in Years 6-12. We will send out a recording of the session to everyone who registered but couldn’t make the live session. Please note, students will only be able to ask questions and chat to the panellists in real time. To get the most out of Industry Live, we hope you can join us live.

Investing in our kids now will deliver massive benefits in the long term

Since we began in 1988, Beacon has been working hard every day to help Tasmania’s young people have a brighter future.  A future where when they finish school, they have both emotional and technical skills and confidence to be an active participant in their community. Now more than ever we need to provide young people with capacity to become more actively engaged in the well-being of our communities.

Post-COVID we do not want to go back to the world we have come from.  We want to see brighter futures for all, but most importantly for our young people. They need a seat at the table in our state affairs and they need it now.  Young people need to be supported in a career that they are passionate about with strong connections to local businesses and employers.  In the wake of the COVID pandemic, our work is now more important than ever.

In 2017, Beacon received funding from the Paul Ramsay Foundation and the Tasmanian Government to do something unique.  With that funding, we began working in six communities across the state to bring together local schools, the community, and businesses to work with young people, help them work out what they wanted to do once they left school and then connect them with those people in their community that could help turn that dream into a reality.

We have called this project ‘Collective Ed’ and so far, it’s having a real impact.  Its focus is on community capacity building, with local people owning local issues and providing the best possible support to young people. In simple terms it’s a whole village raising a child, but the child has an integral voice in the village.

Last week, we held a conference in Hobart to discuss what we’ve learnt so far with Collective Ed, what works, what we can do better and how we can all work together to get the very best for future generations.  Importantly this is ‘warts and all’ with no politics and complete honesty about what works and what doesn’t.

Aptly, we called the conference, ‘Beyond the School Gate’, because while the focus is on kids at school, what we’re trying to do is help young Tasmanians find their way once they leave school.

One of our guest speakers was leading social entrepreneur, Jan Owen.  Jan is a passionate advocate for bringing communities together to get the best possible outcomes, an ethos that we wholeheartedly support.

Jan quoted a staggering piece of research prepared by the Victoria University called the Mitchell Report.  The Report found that “students who leave before finishing year 12 or the equivalent cost taxpayers about $24,000 annually, nearly $1 million over a working lifetime for each individual”.

Just let that sink in.  $1 million over a lifetime.

We can’t reduce everything to its dollar value.  We’re talking about people here, not numbers.  But the point remains, if we don’t provide young Tasmanians with the support they need now, the long-term impacts are going to be significant both at a personal level for the kids as well as for the rest of the community.

We need to invest now to create healthy, successful communities or spend considerably more over decades to come to deal with the consequences.

What we are finding with the Collective Ed project is that for a fraction of that $1 million cost, Beacon, with the support of schools, communities and businesses can help young Tasmanians avoid becoming disengaged and to put them on a pathway to reaching their potential.

We have had great success helping young people work out what they’re passionate about, what sparks them, what makes them want to get out of bed in the morning and giving them the support and opportunities to reach their goals.

But it is not without its challenges.

Research by the Foundation for Young Australians indicates that young people in school today who go on to work will likely need to navigate 17 different jobs spanning five different industries in their lifetime.  What we need to be doing now is to give young Tasmanians a broad set of skills and the confidence to tackle the changing jobs market.

This is a fundamental shift in how we think about our careers and how we provide career education.  Many jobs are related and require similar skills.  Rather than choosing an occupation with an unbroken path to seniority, a young person could think about developing a set of skills that opens doors to a group of potential jobs. Rather than asking a young person, what is your ‘dream job’, it may be more useful to ask what is your group of dream jobs.

We can’t afford to have young Tasmanians leave school without the right skills and knowledge to get the best start in life possible.  That’s why programs like Collective Ed are vital.

The Tasmanian Government clearly recognises this, and we are grateful for their support of Collective Ed.  In any system innovation is fundamental and we are delighted that the Government has invested in this way off the back of other policies, like extending high schools to year 12.

The Tasmanian Government is also embarking on creating a new strategy to support children and young people and this has the potential to be a game changer for future generations.  If the Tasmanian Government can learn from examples like Collective Ed, be bold enough to invest up front in our children and young people in well-targeted ways and continue to grow the economy then we are set to give our kids the chance to be the best they can be.

The challenge is that there are no easy solutions or silver bullets.  We must remain nimble and focused on the task at hand.

That’s the other strong point of the Collective Ed project.  It is flexible and tailored to each individual person and community.  We develop a response that suits the young person, where they’re at on their journey and how to help them get where they want to go, rather than trying to force the square pegs into round holes.  By building community capacity we are building something that is quickly adaptable to suit the circumstances of each young person.

Why are we investing so much time, money, and effort into this?  Because our young people are worth it, and they need us now.

Scott Harris is the Chief Executive of the Beacon Foundation

Tips to build your self-confidence is the topic of the next Industry Live

Join Beacon’s next Industry Live Wednesday 17th March 2021 – 11am to 11.30am.

The next Industry Live is part of our Skills Series. The topic is “How to build your self-confidence”. Our panellist, Fletcher Clark is a 4th year Economics & Law student. Fletcher is also the secretary of the National Association of Australian University Colleges, where he educates and trains other students to support each other in residential colleges. He will share his experiences, advice and tips on how to build your self-confidence, the importance of backing your-self, trying new things and getting outside of your comfort zone.

Register for our March 17 event and receive your zoom link via this link.

We will send out a recording of the session to everyone who registered but couldn’t make the live session. Please note, students will only be able to ask questions and chat to the panellists in real time. To get the most out of Industry Live, we hope you can join us live.

About Industry Live: 

Join Beacon Foundation online for Industry Live, a series of live career awareness and exploration events via video conference. We invite expert industry panellists to share their stories, top tips for success, and answer questions from school students across Australia in a discussion led by a facilitator. Industry Live is open to all students across Australia in Years 6-12. We will send out a recording of the session to everyone who registered but couldn’t make the live session. Please note, students will only be able to ask questions and chat to the panellists in real time. To get the most out of Industry Live, we hope you can join us live.